High Heels and Healthier Feet

I love a pair of tall, black, sexy leather boots.I bought a pair during the post Christmas sale. Boots add style to an outfit whether it’s a shirt and jeans, or a slinky evening dress.  I know a lot of gals that love them too because of the way these boots make us feel: confident, deserving, and bold.

And I want to feel just as great when I get home after a day of back to back meetings, or a night about town, and slide them off my feet. Because there’s nothing as unsexy as feet screaming from the pain of a day in heels.
The secret to foot care is a finding a dazzling pair of shoes.

Start with measuring the correct shoe size.

The best time to measure your shoe size is in the afternoon, because your feet swell during the day. Having the right shoe size can prevent foot problems such as blisters. Keep in mind that one foot may be slightly larger in size than the other, so it’s better to take the measurement of the larger foot. Also, your feet may change  shape over time, so it’s recommended to take a more recent sizing.
I like shoes that have high heels despite the health problems associated with them. Some say heels make the wearer appear taller and their legs more slender, giving them a feeling of empowerment overall. Interestingly, some say it was men in the 1600s European aristocracy who wore heels to show their status as a class that didn’t have to work, and thus could wear impractical footwear. Over time, women’s fashion evolved to copy men’s shoes, to be demonstrate masculine empowerment.

Wear heels no higher than three inches.

Wear heels with care

Additional height puts more stress on the balls of your feet because of the displacement of your body weight. Heels these days can tower over five to six inches, resulting in more injuries from twisted ankles, stumbles, and falls. However, shoes that are closer to the ground can have problems also. Ballet flats and flip flops are two types of footwear that don’t offer enough arch support. Arch support is particularly critical for those who have flat feet. If you definitely want height in your shoe, three inches is the classic height, although they recommend two inches or less to have the least disruption to the natural biomechanics of walking.

Even after settling on the ideal height for your shoe, you still have so many options available to choose from… and these options are like the sugar candy of shoes and the bane of foot health advocates.

Choose chunkier heels and wider toe boxes.

Stilettos can turn the heads of admirers, but the wearer must be able to balance their body weight, which is being pushed forward, as well as focused on a tiny area of the heel. This design decreases the body’s ability to absorb shock, and can result in knee, hip, and back pain. A chunky heel is better able to distribute body weight.
Pointed toes are another popular shoe design. Unfortunately, a pointed toe can cause problems such as hammertoes and bunions over time, because of the pressure on the sides of your toes and ball of your foot when your weight is shifted forward. A wide toe box reduces the long term risk of problems such as bunions. Another solution is buying a shoe which starts to narrow at a point further from the tips of your toes.

Wear heels but take care of your feet.

If you are like me, and can’t resist sacrificing style over comfort, you can take care of your feet and still wear those boots with four inch heels.
  1. Invest in a pair of inserts  to cushion the sole and ball of your foot.
  2. Buy shoes with good shock absorption and arch support.
  3. Alternate between wearing heels and wearing flatter soled shoes.
  4. Incorporate heel lifts and drops into your exercise routine to strengthen your ankles.
For me, I want to have feet that look good underneath that pair of gorgeous new boots. Wouldn’t you?


Contact me for more information about living healthy.

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